New York’s Newest Pizza Creation? Wait for Dessert

By Arthur Bovino
March 1, 2018

Chocolate pizza. No, not a hard chocolate disc or round of pizza dough slathered with syrup or spread with melted chocolate, but a dough made with chocolate, that rises and bakes similarly to a conventional New York City pie. It’s the newest creation of Sofia Pizza Shoppe, the pizzeria that last year, introduced New Yorkers to the $38 dollar, 12-hour risen pizza creation, the Doughdici.

In the annals of dessert pizza, the modern classic has to be the Nutella pie. Typically made at Neapolitan pizzerias and topped with bananas or strawberries, Nutella pizza still thrills tourists and the less jaded. Grimaldi’sRizzo’s, Adoro Lei, SottocasaSan Matteo Pizza, Antika, Olio e PiúKesté, GnoccoSong E NapuleLuzzo’s, and Sorbillo are a handful of New York spots all serving pies topped with the palm oil-hazelnut spread.

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All the Pizza Places in the East Village

By Arthur Bovino
January 30, 2018

How many pizzerias are there in the East Village? If you Google “East Village Pizza” the results are fragmented into the several pages we’ve all become familiar with and not quite been satisfied by (Google, why do some places always seem to be missing?). Then you have Yelp, whose results are paid for, er… just patently absurd (Lombardi’s and Prince Street Pizza are both in Nolita, and not so fast, &pizza). Using Houston to 14th Streets as the south-north boundaries and the East River to the Bowery as the east-west limits, doing a block by block survey on Google images and street maps, the answer seems to be 37.

That number is a little fuzzy. A few places (Emily and Joe & Pat’s) haven’t opened yet and a few places aren’t technically pizzerias but do serve pizza. That 37 also doesn’t include Domino’s, which is its own animal. Pie by the Pound and Artichoke technically aren’t in the East Village. The former is on the other side of the hood’s western boundary (4th Avenue). And since Artichoke moved to its new location across 14th Street, it joins the jumble of neighborhoods (Gramercy Park, Stuyvesant Square, and Stuyvesant Town) north of the East Village and Alphabet City.

How many pizzerias are there in the East Village?

Forgoing all questions of quality, this total should be pretty close. Are there any missing? Are there any omitted East Village restaurants serving pizza? Check out the list and the map below and please shout if something obvious hasn’t been included.

EAST VILLAGE PIZZA
Solo Pizza NYC
Gruppo Thin Crust
Tramonti Pizza
F & M Slice Pizza
Baker’s Pizza
East Village Pizza
Motorino
Proto’s Pizza
Nicoletta
Martina
Joe’s Pizza
99 Pizza
99 Cents Fresh Pizza
Luzzo’s La Pizza Napoletana
Muzzarella Pizza
2 Bros Pizza
Gotham Pizza
Three of Cups
Little Gio’s Pizza
Lil’ Frankie’s
Vinny Vincenz Pizza
Bruno Pizza
Numero 28 Pizzeria
Baker’s Pizza
Johnny Favorites Pizzeria
Yankee Pizza
Iggy’s
Stromboli Pizza
Two Boots
FDR 99¢ Slice Pizza
Double Zero
Ray’s Pizza & Bagel Cafe
Eleven B
Emily
Gnocco
Loverboy
Joe & Pat’s

— 🍕🤠

What Is the Catalan “Pizza” Called Coca?

By Arthur Bovino
January 20, 2018

When the Adrià brothers are involved, you never know what bite to expect next. But when it comes to one upcoming project of these two world famous modernist chefs, a food hall in the Hudson Yards, there are hints. Albert told Eater they plan it to be their “homage to the Spanish cuisine” and that there would be “three restaurants and smaller places to taste Spanish specialties, mostly tapas.” In addition to tapas and jamon bars, and a tortilla stand, some pizzaphiles may have been intrigued to hear Adrià say it will also serve coca, “the mostly unknown Spanish pizza, which we intend to put on the world’s food map.”

So what is coca?

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The Lost Pizza Files: Pizza Writing From The Archives (2009-2010)

It can be fun (though sometimes cringe-inducing) to read things you’ve written years ago. So it’s been a bit of a blast to have stumbled across a cache of pizza writing from almost a decade ago. I’d thought that these 20 posts, originally published on AlwaysHungryNY, had been lost for good. They never got repurposed (save this one on the cold cheese slice) when we launched The Daily Meal, and despite early assurances by a former colleague, the original site was allowed to disappear. I don’t know why it took me this long to try to find them on the Wayback Machine — it certainly would have been a helpful thing to have thought of during numerous pizza caption-writing occasions over the years — but here they are now, nonetheless, and without all the weird stylization of an arbitrary stylebook (#nogrudgeshere).

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New York City’s Best Pizza By Price

I’ve worked on numerous pizza lists over the years, each with its own challenges when it comes to ranking. But coming up with a list of New York City’s best pizzas by price for First We Feast? Well, this one was a doozy. It may also be one of the more interesting and difficult pizza lists I’ve worked on.

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Cornering the Market on Grandma Pizza in Hell’s Kitchen at Corner Slice

Ivan Orkin, the brash Jewish guy from Long Island who supposedly had no business opening a wildly successful ramen shop, is now the ramen guy whose brand seemed to have nothing to do with pizza and who has now opened Corner Slice, a grandma pie joint.

“You could say I’m the white guy making ramen, but the white guy went to Japan in 1980 and learned how to make it for 30 years,”Orkin retorts. “My family was Japanese and my heart is Japanese. Pizza is no different. I was born in Lenox Hill Hospital and been here my whole life. The experience of a great pizzeria… it’s who I am. If you listen to my backstory one of the things that reminded me about ramen was New York diners. Your guy was always there. You could get your food pretty quickly. I think pizzerias are really similar.”

The truth, as Orkin and partner David Poran quickly point out, is that Corner Slice, Gotham West Market’s new pizzeria, is the brainchild of chef and partner Mike Bergemann, 29, who Orkin and Poran call “the mastermind of the pizza.”

It’s been asserted that 2017 will be the year of the square pizza in New York City, a declaration Corner Slice will help cement. Bergemann describes the pizza he and his younger brother Pete, 27, are baking in an electric PizzaMaster deck oven from as “a blend of every square-style pie.” Actually, thinking inside the box has been on the rise for years. Prince Street Pizza opened with squares in 2012, when chef Michael White was also testing square pies at his East Village Midwestern riff Nicoletta. Razor-thin edged square icon Rizzo’s opened in 2013, on the Lower East Side after being Queens-bound nearly 55 years, and quadrate aspirations made news in 2015 at beloved Brooklyn pizzeria Roberta’s and with Matt and Emily Hyland of Emmy Squared.

A topdown view of the pizza at Corner Slice.
Mike Bergemann calls his grandma pizza “a blend of every square-style pie.”

Square-centric pizzerias have been pretty successful recently. Prince Street’s Spicy Spring square now tops many pizza-lovers best-of lists, Rizzo’s soldiers on and Matt and Emily’s Emmy Squared is an Instagram staple bound to amplify the trend when their second Detroit-style spot opens in the former Blue Ribbon Bakery space. (It will be their first Manhattan pizzeria). With 310 Bowery, grandma pizzas (always square) have even entered a New York City bar pie arena dominated by poofy crusted quasi-Neapolitan rounds at Alligator Lounge and Crocodile Lounge in Williamsburg and the East Village. But lackluster “Detroit” squares at the new Bryant Park Whole Foods (not good) are a reminder that it’s quality, not being on-trend, that leads to success.

You’ll find that focus on quality at Corner Slice.

“The pie is special because it’s made properly,” Orkin explains. “I don’t mean to sound like a jerk but we have good flour made with care and fermented the way dough is supposed to be fermented in my opinion. And I think we decided we could make a little less money and buy better ingredients and make it up in volume. We’re really doing that on purpose because we want people to enjoy the pizza and not get caught up in the price of artisanal ingredients. The reason why slice business has fallen off is because they’re not using great ingredients. New York took a bit of a left turn into Neapolitan style and we’ve lost our way a little bit in terms of what New York pizza is. It’s been an international phenomenon and while it’s absolutely delicious when done properly, it’s just not New York pizza. Remember, that’s means going to John’s where they say, ‘No Slices,’ and it’s like, ‘Dude, how many times do I have to tell you we just serve pies.'”

Corner Slice’s signature tomato square calls on New Haven tomato apizza and Jersey tomato pies for inspiration. The crust is airy and light with a pocked, golden-crispy undercarriage and a wide, dark edge reminiscent of a crunchy bread loaf that should eliminate comparisons to focaccia. There’s a thorough slathering of bright tomato — part California sauce, part Jersey chunk — spread across the base and a scattering of garlic confit. It’s garnished with a gentle Di Fara finish of grated cheese and a drizzle of olive oil (fresh basil goes on the pie into the oven).

The effect of enjoying Bergemann’s tomato slice and an espresso almost has more in common with the fresh, crusty pan con tomate traditionally served with coffee in Catalonia. And in case it wasn’t obvious, that’s not a bad thing at all. It’s a delicious slice.

Bergemann has a ton of ideas and he’s been involved in every part of the design and process. (He did all the branding and design with his girlfriend Courtney Inge.) There are 10 to 20 baked goods in the mornings until pizza starts being made at 11:30 am, including a delicious lard bread. I caught up with Mike Bergemann the day before he opened Corner Slice to learn more about the philosophy behind what he and his partners are doing at Corner Slice.

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2010 New York City Pizza Run

Ready, set, go! Er, no, wait, eat! No! Run!

There may have been some confused passers-by and homeless people at Tompkins Square Park on Sunday, but the 65 people who gathered there at 11 o’clock in the morning knew the score. Four laps around the park (2.25 miles), with stops after three for a slice of pizza. It was the first annual New York City Pizza Run, an event conceived by pizza blogger, Jason Feirman (I Dream of Pizza).

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Le Fooding’s “Any Way You Slice It”

Any Way You Slice It, it was a New York Neapolitan pizza-lovers’ ultimate dream, a Le Fooding preview at Co. that featured some of the City’s hottest pizza-makers.

Representing Manhattan: Pulino’s Nate Appleman; Jim Lahey of Co. (the evening’s host); and Heather Carlucci of Print. Representing Brooklyn: Mathieu Palombino of Motorino, and Mark Iacono of Lucali. Five pizzas were paired with Rhône Valley Wines introduced by Blue Hill at Stone Barns’ sommelier, Thomas Carter.

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Kesté’s Insalata “Pizza Sandwich”

Last June, when Grub Street reported on the pizza wallet at Kesté Pizza & Vino, aka “the portfolio,” we took note with excitement — the Neapolitan pie goes portable! But we measured the ‘Neapolitan’ equivalent of New York’s street slice against the original with mixed results.

While they tasted good, wallets made with regular Kesté pies (they wouldn’t make minis), with toppings and without, eaten crust or tip first, either burst open or devolved into a mess of bread and cheese. Whether you were sitting or walking, it was a fail. A new innovation at Kesté, the “pizza sandwich,” had more promise.

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New York’s Best Pizza Brunch Is At Roberta’s In Brooklyn

The concrete jungle sizzles in summer. Light twinkles off the glass condo windows through waves of heat. You get jostled by sweaty sidewalk-denizens. The city is too much. Too full, too busy, too— too much. It’s Saturday. Almost noon. Or maybe Sunday and already past two. You’re hungry. Need food. Brunch. Breakfast. But you don’t want French toast. Enough eggs Benedict. You laugh in the face of omelettes. You want something different, somewhere else. It’s time to flip this meal upside-down. You need to head to Brooklyn — to Roberta’s. You need pizza for brunch.

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